The Cochrane Schizophrenia Group

Processing the process: Systematic Reviews

By Angelique Bodart, Editorial Assistant for the CSzG

As you look through the Cochrane Library > Schizophrenia and Psychosis you notice that the one thing you were hoping to find isn’t there but you know for a fact that there’s trials out there looking at that exact thing.  Why is there not a systematic review on that topic?  Because you or another clinician have not contacted us to ask to write one, or perhaps it is being done behind the scenes you just don’t know it yet.  As we have seen from Prescribing as a junior doctor: do we know what we think we know? and The Clozapine rollercoaster, systematic reviews are very important to doctors, they are also very important to patients, as they enable both to make an informed decision about how to treat schizophrenia or at least support recovery and stability.  Unfortunately systematic reviews of drugs, therapies, ECT, hospitalisation procedures etc. don’t happen by magic.  They happen because someone has contacted us with an interest they wish to pursue, to establish the usefulness of, with other like-minded people. Read the rest of this entry »

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Old side effects and old drugs; old side effects and new drugs

silence the voices - still the visions

silence the voices – still the visions (Photo credit: Jackal1)

By Clive Adams

People using antipsychotic drugs like chlorpromazine and haloperidol get [anticholinergic] side effects such as blurred vision, dry mouth and constipation but the proportion of people experiencing these is not clear.

Past surveys are very old indeed, small and not really proper surveys at all. Their results had been perpetuated for decades without verification. They were undertaken so long ago that they were only about older drugs – so the lack of verification had resulted in bias as the older drugs held their reputation of causing these effects and the newer ones never gathered it in the same way. Read the rest of this entry »

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